High Design Meets High Function in PCKT Vaporizers

As Canada works towards next year’s launch of an adult-use cannabis market, there are still some key regulatory issues to hammer out. One of which is how the country should handle its existing medical marijuana program. A pair of pharmacology researchers at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, want to see officials separate medical and […]

Cannabis Retail Guide: Smōk, Ajax

As Canada works towards next year’s launch of an adult-use cannabis market, there are still some key regulatory issues to hammer out. One of which is how the country should handle its existing medical marijuana program. A pair of pharmacology researchers at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, want to see officials separate medical and […]

7 Cannabis-Friendly Summer Attractions in Canada

As Canada works towards next year’s launch of an adult-use cannabis market, there are still some key regulatory issues to hammer out. One of which is how the country should handle its existing medical marijuana program. A pair of pharmacology researchers at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, want to see officials separate medical and […]

High Seas: Weed Smuggling Submarine Captured by Coast Guard

As Canada works towards next year’s launch of an adult-use cannabis market, there are still some key regulatory issues to hammer out. One of which is how the country should handle its existing medical marijuana program. A pair of pharmacology researchers at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, want to see officials separate medical and […]

What to Do With Disappointing Weed

As Canada works towards next year’s launch of an adult-use cannabis market, there are still some key regulatory issues to hammer out. One of which is how the country should handle its existing medical marijuana program. A pair of pharmacology researchers at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, want to see officials separate medical and […]

New York: Legislation Introduced To Expand Patients’ Medical Marijuana Access

Update: The 2017 legislative session came to a close with lawmakers taking no further action A 8598.
Update: On July 10, A. 8598 was referred to committee.
Legislation is pending in the Assembly, A. 8598, to expand the pool of patients eligible for medical cannabis therapy.

The measure eliminates the state’s limiting list of qualifying conditions. Rather, it leaves the decision of whether to recommend medical cannabis entirely up to the discretion of each individual physician. 

It states, “[M]edical marihuana may be used for a condition, or symptom or complication of the condition or its treatment, for which, in the practitioner’s professional opinion and review of past treatments, the patient is likely to receive therapeutic or palliative benefit from primary or adjunctive treatment.”

Physicians already possess similar discretion when it comes to prescribing pharmaceutical drugs that pose far greater health risks than cannabis. Politicians should not be arbitrarily interfering in this doctor/patient relationship.

Please enter your e-mail below to urge lawmakers to support A. 8598.

National: Tell AAA To Stop Lying About Legalization

Over the first six months of 2017, the American Automobile Association (aka AAA) has been spreading misinformation and propaganda in a lobbying effort to defeat marijuana legalization legislative efforts in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, and other states.

As reported by Leafly.com, AAA representatives have recently preyed upon unsubstantiated fears regarding the alleged “increased plague of drugged driving” and the claim that “more babies will be born high” on marijuana in their lobbying efforts against adult use regulatory reforms. The distortions do nothing to advance the public debate surrounding legalization, but they do tarnish the organization’s reputation.  

According to federal data, auto accident fatalities have fallen significantly over the past two decades – during the same time that a majority of US states have legalized marijuana for either medical or social use. In 1996 when California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana, the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported that there were an estimated 37,500 fatal car crashes on US roadways. This total fell to under 30,000 by 2014.

Further, a recently published study in the American Journal of Public Health reports that fatal traffic accident rates in legal marijuana states are no different than those in states where cannabis remains illegal. A separate study published last year in the same journal previously reported that the enactment of medical marijuana legalization laws is associated with a reduction in traffic fatalities compared to other states, particularly among younger drivers.

One would hope that AAA would be nonpartisan in this debate; that they would be the group to separate the facts from the myths so that politicians and law enforcement would be more likely to pursue evidence-based policies with regard to regulating marijuana in a manner that strengthens public safety. Instead they’re largely fearmongering and further politicizing the issue — calling for the continued criminalization and arrest of millions of Americans who choose to use marijuana privately and responsibly. By doing so, they are arguing in favor of the failed criminal justice policies of the past and they are alienating the 60 percent of Americans who endorse the outright legalization of recreational cannabis by adults (Gallup, 2016).

There are areas of public policy where AAA is absolutely in agreement with reform advocates, including NORML. For instance, we both agree that driving under the influence of cannabis should be discouraged and legally prohibited, and that the detection of either THC or its metabolites in blood or urine is not indicative of psychomotor impairment and, therefore, should not be used a legal standard of criminal liability.
Our hope is that some day groups like NORML and AAA can work together to advocate for rational policies that work to keep our roadways safe from the threat of impaired drivers. Specifically, we recognize — as does AAA — that there is a need for greater tools and methods  to more accurately determine whether or not someone is under the influence of cannabis, such as via the use and promotion of handheld performance technology.

Tell AAA that the days of ‘reefer madness’ are over. It’s time for a rational and evidence-based discussion regarding how best to regulate the use of marijuana by adults and how to keep our roads safe.

Please fill out the pre-written letter below and urge AAA to rethink their stance on marijuana policy.

Federal: Amendment To Expand Veterans’ Access to Medical Marijuana

Update: Identical language was introduced in the House by Representative Earl Blumenauer and cosponsored by 9 Republicans and 9 Democrats. House Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions blocked the amendment from consideration. 
Update: The Senate Appropriations Committee voted 24-7 to include the amendment as part of the 2018 MilCon-VA bill. 
The Veterans Equal Access Amendment, which would expand medical cannabis access to eligible military veterans, is expected to be offered to the 2018 Military Construction, Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies Appropriations (MilCon-VA) bill. 

Presently, V.A. doctors are forbidden from providing the paperwork necessary to complete a recommendation, thus forcing military veterans to seek the advice of a private, out-of-network physician.
Last year, majorities in both the US House and Senate voted to include similar language as part of the Fiscal Year 2017 MilCon-VA bill. However, Republicans sitting on the House Appropriations Committee elected to remove the language from the bill during a concurrence vote. We must not allow a similar outcome again this year. Lawmakers must stop playing politics with veterans’ health and pass and enact this amendment.

Veterans are increasingly turning to medical cannabis as an effective alternative to opioids and other conventional medications to treat conditions like chronic pain and post-traumatic stress. A retrospective review of patients’ symptoms published in 2014 in the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs reported a greater than 75 percent reduction on a scale of post-traumatic symptom scores following cannabis therapy. This is why, in recent months, two of the largest veterans’ rights groups — AMVETS and the American Legion —  have resolved in favor of patients’ access to cannabis therapy.

Our veterans deserve the option to legally access a botanical product that is objectively safer than the litany of pharmaceutical drugs it could replace.

Enter your information below to urge your Senators to support the Veterans Equal Access Amendment.

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